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While houseplants have the ability to bring life to a room and purify the air while doing it, a drawback is that many houseplants are toxic to animals. Here are 10 plants that add beauty to your home without worry.

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Topping out at 6 to 8 inches, this plant is ideal for small spaces such as bookshelves and end tables. Its red, cream and green leaves curl up at night, giving it its name. What’s more, it’s one of the easiest houseplants you can grow.

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This plant is named for the ease with which it can be divided and shared—so if you happen to receive such a gift, rest assured it’s safe for your cats and dogs. But beware, pets may be especially drawn to the fuzzy, crinkly leaves.

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The variegated gray-and-green leaves of this plant make it an attractive option for the home. It’s one of many great easy-care houseplants safe for pets.

LEAF, which stands for leadership, education and farming, is the brainchild of Heidi Witmer who dreamed of putting a crew of students representing diverse segments of the community to work on a farm where they learn how to raise crops and prepare food while building their own leadership skills.

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These toys are contoured to feel like food, right down to the sprinkles and tomato leaves, and are easy to clean and sanitize. $10.99 at Amazon

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Keto dieters don’t have to miss out on the summer fun with this low carb cocktail from @theketodadlife. Fresh lime juice, basil leaf, kombucha, and berry sparkling water give this vodka drink plenty of flavor.

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Solo hiker Elena of @hikinghacks totally changes the game on staying fresh during camping trips with this soap hack. She creates single use soap leaves by using a regular bar of soap and a potato peeler to keep her pack light while also staying clean. Another tip? Soap can take some of the itch out of mosquito bites.

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Technically, professionals recommend cleaning your gutters twice per year, in both the spring and fall. But if you’re realistically only going to clean them once per year, it’s best to wait until fall, after the majority of the leaves and branches have fallen, so you can be sure the gutters are properly cleared before winter.

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