{{featured_button_text}}

Ask/Answered is a weekly feature for reader-submitted questions. Follow the blog online at www.cumberlink.com:

What is the piping and construction on South Middlesex Road near the LeTort Spring Run in Middlesex Township?

Seeing large piping go in is not a new sight for people in the Midstate, but the pipes along South Middlesex Road in Middlesex Township near the LeTort Spring Run have nothing to do with the highly publicized Mariner East 2 pipeline.

It is actually part of renovations to the Carlisle Borough sewer system, according to Middlesex Township Zoning Officer Mark Carpenter.

The 24-inch black piping that now sits along South Middlesex Road and Mill Road in Middlesex Township is part of a bypass for a sewer main that runs through the township to Carlisle’s sewer treatment facility, Carpenter said.

He said the bypass was set up to allow crews to clean out the main line and install a liner that will protect the line from water getting into the pipe, and prevent sewage from leaking out, Carpenter said.

Middlesex Township and a few other municipalities in the county have a cooperation agreement with the borough to use its sewage system.

The Middlesex Township bypass and renovation is part of a larger project to rehabilitate the borough’s aging sewer infrastructure.

In July, Mark Malarich, the borough’s public works director, told The Sentinel the project involves about 4.5 miles of sewer mains that run to the borough’s treatment facility.

The project is expected to cost about $9 million and include lining roughly 23,100 feet of pipe by putting an internal sock through the pipe, a method meant to provide structural integrity at lower cost than completely replacing the piping.

Sections of the borough’s sewer pipes date back to 1914.

The project was announced in 2014.

Subscribe to Breaking News

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

In November, the borough reviewed a study that recommends an increase in sewer rates by about $12 per year to help fund operation and repair to the borough’s sewer system.

Send us your questions

Need an answer? We can help.

The Sentinel wants to know what you have always wanted to know.

Whether it’s politics, crime, history or just something you’ve always been curious about, if you have questions, The Sentinel will look for the answer and provide it in our online blog and as a weekly feature in the Sentinel print edition.

Shoot us an email at frontdoor@cumberlink.com, call 240-7125 or stop by the office to submit your questions.

The best questions will be featured in weekly Ask/Answered columns online and in print.

Subscribe to Breaking News

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Email Joshua Vaughn at jvaughn@cumberlink.com. Follow him on Twitter at @Sentinel_Vaughn.

0
0
1
0
0