With military parade, Kim Jong Un thumbs nose at US

In this image made from video released by KRT, North Korean soldiers march during a military parade in Pyongyang, Thursday, Feb. 8 2018. North Korea held a military parade and rally on Kim Il Sung Square on Thursday, just one day before South Korea holds the opening ceremony for the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics. (KRT via AP Photo)

The Associated Press

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un presided over an extravagant military parade in Pyongyang's Kim Il Sung Square on Thursday, grabbing the spotlight on the eve of the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics in South Korea to thumb his nose at Washington while making a point of showing off his new-found restraint toward Seoul.

The parade itself had been anticipated for weeks.

North Korea announced last month that it would hold a big event to mark the 70th anniversary of the founding of its military.

But instead of broadcasting the morning event live, North Korean television aired an edited version later in the day, giving it a somewhat lower profile than expected. The parade was also shorter and featured fewer missiles than the previous one, which was held in April last year and unveiled five new kinds of missiles — surprising analysts and generating headlines worldwide.

This time, Kim fine-tuned his more fiery rhetoric toward Washington.

Addressing tens of thousands of troops and civilians assembled on the square below him, Kim said the parade marks North Korea's emergence as a "global military power" despite facing the "worst sanctions." He called for his military to maintain a high level of combat readiness against the United States and its followers to keep them from infringing upon "the republic's sacred dignity and autonomy even by 0.001 millimeters."

He made no mention of the Olympics in the parts of his speech that were broadcast. It was unclear whether the North showed the entirety of his speech during the recorded coverage of the parade.

The tone was in line with Kim's bigger strategy of late.

He has been making a major diplomatic push toward South Korea since he announced a last-minute proposal to send a delegation of athletes, officials and entertainers to the Pyeongchang games during his annual New Year's address.

The moves have been generally welcomed in the South.

Even as the missiles were rolling by his viewing stand, South Korean officials announced that Kim's younger sister, due to attend Friday's opening ceremony, will have a luncheon with South Korean President Moon Jae-in. That in itself is a major breakthrough for the Koreas. Kim Yo Jong is one of Kim Jong Un's closest confidants and she will be the first member of the Kim family to visit the South.

0
0
0
0
0

Load comments