Enola woman sentenced for running a prostitution business

2011-10-26T07:33:00Z 2011-10-26T15:18:12Z Enola woman sentenced for running a prostitution businessBy Stephanie Weaver, Sentinel Reporter The Sentinel
October 26, 2011 7:33 am  • 

Traci Sposito's daily routine has changed quite a bit since last May.

The 45-year-old woman was previously making as much as $1,000 a day through a prostitution "maid" business she ran out of her East Pennsboro Township home.

Now Sposito spends her days working two jobs and volunteering with the female defendants program to help other women facing criminal charges.

The change she's made in her life did not go unnoticed Tuesday morning during her sentencing on the prostitution charges.

Deputy Public Defender Arla Waller explained to Cumberland County Court of Common Pleas Judge Edward Guido that Sposito is no longer working for the "maid service" but instead has two waitressing jobs.

"I was going to say, I hope she has different employment," Guido said.

When she isn't at work, Waller said, Sposito spends much of her time working with the female defendants program, "It's About Change."

Natasha DiPrizito, a counselor with the program, said that Sposito is an "immense help" and serves as a "sounding board" for the other defendants in the program.

"Traci comes in every day and has been an amazing support as a peer advocate," DiPrizito said.

She explained how Sposito has many computer-related skills and can help defendants who come in and need help with things such as setting up email accounts.

"She's kind of a jack of all trades," DiPrizito said. "It's so admirable that she could put (her problems) on the back burner and help others."

Sposito told the judge that she also has several medical issues, stating that she has recently been throwing up blood and dealing with dehydration and dizziness. She said she has several appointments set up at Penn State Hershey Medical Center, but that she has no insurance to cover the expenses.

"She's doing well, but she still has some hurdles to go through," Waller said. Waller asked Guido to consider allowing the 15 days Sposito previously spent in jail to serve as the penalty for the charges.

"I'd ask that you consider the steps that Traci has taken on her own to get her life back together," Waller said.

Ring busted

Sposito spent the time behind bars following her arrest in May when police discovered she was running a prostitution business and advertising it online.

Police said Sposito moved into the townhouse on March 17 and that the business was just getting off the ground when they discovered it through an online posting at "backpage.com."

A search of backpage.com showed that it is a free site, with a personals ads and an adult subsection.

The adult subsection includes links to ads for escorts, strippers and "adult jobs," while the personals includes a "no strings attached" link. A disclaimer pops up with each link warning of sexual content, including "pictorial nudity" and adult language.

Investigators contacted the advertisers and arranged to meet with two women and engage in "unprotected sexual activity" at the home in the first block of Southmont Drive for a fee, police said.

When investigators went to the home, they arrested three girls after they accepted money in exchange for the services, police said. Sposito was later identified as the one running the business, which was bringing in between $500 and $1,000 a day.

Sposito pleaded guilty to prostitution and related offenses and to criminal use of a communication facility Aug. 18.

‘No benefit'

Chief Deputy District Attorney Matthew Smith asked Guido to order Sposito to serve the 30-day standard range sentence and to pay a "stiff fine," to make up for the profits Sposito made through the illegal business.

However, Guido decided that making Sposito pay a fine would be "counter productive," especially with her ensuing medical costs.

The judge ordered Sposito to time served to 23 month plus 80 hours of community service for the prostitution and related offenses conviction.

"There is no benefit in sending the defendant back to jail for 15 days simply to make it a standard sentence," Guido said.

The judge noted the "substantial efforts she's made to get her life back on track since the offense" for the mitigated penalty.

Guido then sentenced Sposito to 24 months of probation for using the Internet to promote the business.

Guido explained to the defendant that, given the lighter sentence, she must continue to take the necessary steps to put her back together.

"You're not going to see me back in here," Sposito said, nodding as she turned to walk out of the courtroom.


Posted at 7:18 p.m. Tuesday on Cumberlink:

An Enola woman that pleaded guilty to running a prostitution businesses from her home will not be spending any more time in prison.

Judge Edward Guido determined Tuesday morning that there would be "no benefit" to sending Traci M. Sposito, 45, back to Cumberland County Prison. Sposito spent 15 days behind bars following her arrest in May when police discovered she was running a prostitution business and advertising it online.

Police said the business was just getting off the ground when it was stopped and was bringing in between $500 and $1,000 a day.

Sposito told Guido Tuesday that she is trying to get her life back in order and now has two waitressing jobs.

Sposito has also gotten very involved with the female defendant program and volunteers every day.

Natasha DiPrizito, a counselor with the program, said that Sposito is a "jack of all trades" and serves as a "sounding board" for the other defendants in the program.

Sposito also shared with Guido that she has several medical issues that she is currently dealing with but that she has no insurance coverage.

Chief Deputy District Attorney Matthew Smith asked Guido to order Sposito to pay a "stiff fine" for the charges, to make up for the profits from the illegal business.

However, Guido decided that making Sposito pay a fine would be "counter-productive," especially with her ensuing medical costs.

Guido ordered Sposito to a time-served to 23 month sentence, noting that the bottom of the standard range sentence for the prostitution charge is 30 days.

"There is no benefit in sending the defendant back to jail for 15 days simply to make it a standard sentence," Guido said.

The judge noted the substantial steps Sposito has taken to turn her life around.

Guido sentenced Sposito to 24 months of probation for using the Internet to promote the business.

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