It’s not vaping or e-cigarettes; the latest trend with kids is “Juuling.”

Most parents wouldn’t know what it looks like unless they know what to look for.

“Kids are buying them online and from various places,” said David Gilbert, Cumberland Valley assistant principal. Many local schools around the Midstate are battling a recent uptick in Juuling.

“We’re working with Cumberland and Perry Drug and Alcohol Commission to tell our staff what to look for,” Gilbert said. “We’re working on getting info out to parents.”

What is Juuling?

“It’s all one solid piece,” said Michael Weibley, manager at Smokers Express in Enola. “There’s a cap on the end where you just rip that off, and your USB charging port is on that.”

Users put a nicotine pack called a Juul pod into the device. According to the company’s website, each Juul-pod is enough for 200 puffs. It has about the same amount of nicotine as a pack of cigarettes.

“These devices are so tiny, so small, so innocuous looking that they could pass as a flash drive” Gilbert said. “Many parents, many adults, many people, in general, don’t know what they’re looking at when they see them.”

They aren’t cheap, either.

“A pack of Newport cigarettes right now go for $7.61 a pack,” Weibly said. “The Juul on the other hand, they’re asking 50 bucks for the battery and a four-pack of pods.”

Smokers Express in Enola stopped selling them. “We had a lot of complaints about it leaking into customers mouths,” Weibly said. “But you can still buy them at many gas stations.”

Juul Labs says its mission is to eliminate combustible cigarette smoking by offering existing adult smokers a better alternative. Juul Labs said they strongly condemn the use of the product by minors and said it’s illegal to sell to minors.

Yet, many students in the Midstate are getting their hands on the devices. School administrators say the best way to keep your kids safe is to start a conversation about it at home.

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