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Sentencing_lists
Cumberland County Sentencing List for March 27

The following people were sentenced on March 27 in Cumberland County Court of Common Pleas. All sentences include costs and run concurrently with other sentences unless otherwise specified. Probation is unsupervised unless indicated otherwise. Driving under the influence (DUI) offenses generate different mandatory-minimum sentences based on an offender’s prior convictions in the past 10 years.

Sentenced to State Correctional Institute

Camp Hill

  • Deborah Faye McNaughton: Thirty-five months to 70 months and 96 hours of community service for burglary-adapted overnight accommodation, no person present. (Placey)

Carlisle

  • Richard Lee Bleyer Jr.: Eighteen months to 60 months and restitution of $870 for burglary-adapted overnight accommodation, no person present; 12 months to 60 months for theft by unlawful taking or disposition. (Guido)
  • Robert Ugean Harper: Two and one-half years to 5 years for unlawful delivery, manufacture, possession with intent to deliver a Schedule I controlled substance. (Masland)

Duncannon

  • John Andrew Freet: Ninety days and $1,000 fine for driving while under suspension-DUI-related, credit of 90 days; 18 months to 5 years and $1,500 fine for DUI, high rate. (Brewbaker)

Shermans Dale

  • Justin Eugene Lloyd: Nineteen months to 38 months, $200 fine and restitution of $89 for theft by unlawful taking or disposition; six months to 24 months for simple assault, consecutive; 6 months to 12 months and restitutions of $500 and $678.50 for criminal mischief; costs for harassment; 12 months to 24 months for strangulation, consecutive to all. (Peck)

Sentenced to Cumberland County Prison

Boiling Springs

  • Rachel Pearle Shoop: Time served to 23 months and restitution of $1,006 for theft by unlawful taking or disposition. (Masland)

Carlisle

  • Tyrone Richard Allen: Seventy-two hours to 6 months and $1,000 fine for DUI, controlled substances; 60 days’ probation and $25 fine for unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia. (Brewbaker)
  • Neil Alan Darhower: Two days to 6 months and $500 fine for DUI, high rate. (Guido)
  • Corey Lee Fite: Forty-eight hours to 6 months and $500 fine for DUI, high rate. (Masland)
  • Ahmed Zaki Pakhtiawal: Five days to 6 months, $300 fine and 150 days’ probation for DUI, second offense. (Placey)
  • Dianna Mae Sheaffer: Thirty days to 6 months for DUI, high rate, second offense. (Brewbaker)

Dillsburg

  • Katherine Drew Kempson: Ten months to 23 months, 24 months’ consecutive probation and restitutions of $114, $250.70 $182, $570.19 for writing bad checks. (Masland)

Harrisburg

  • Ronald Isiah Whittaker: Time served to 90 days for disorderly conduct. (Masland)

Lemoyne

  • Sharon Teresa London: Five days to 6 months, $300 fine for DUI, second offense. (Brewbaker)

Mechanicsburg

  • Alfred J. Fournier: Ninety days to 24 months, restitution of $543.50 and $635.50, 36 months’ probation and 24 hours of community service for accidents involving death or personal injury while not properly licensed; 60 days for driving while under suspension-DUI-related, consecutive. (Placey)
  • Shaun M. Maurey: Thirty days to 6 months, $750 fine and restitution of $3,007 for DUI, high rate, second offense. (Brewbaker)

Middletown

  • Carlene Dee Daniels: Thirty days to 6 months and $300 fine for DUI, second offense, credit of 25 days. (Brewbaker)

New Cumberland

  • Wesley A. Law: Time served to 23 months and $200 fine for simple assault. (Masland)
  • Mark Stephen Swatt: Ten days to 180 days and $300 fine for DUI. (Placey)

Newville

  • Bruce Eugene Durf: Seventy-two hours to 6 months and $1,000 fine for DUI, highest rate, credit of 3 days. (Peck)
  • Dave Allen Slenker: Seventy-two hours to 6 months and $1,000 fine for DUI, highest rate; $200 fine for driving while under suspension. (Peck)

Shippensburg

  • Sarsalan Sajjad Jaffry: Six months to 23 months, $100 fine and restitution of $191.91 for criminal conspiracy to theft by unlawful taking or disposition; 6 months to 23 months and $150 fine for criminal conspiracy to simple assault. (Brewbaker)
  • Jeffrey Charles Malone: Five days to 6 months and $300 fine for DUI. (Masland)
  • Steven Wallace Robertson: Time served to 6 months and restitution of $50 for institutional vandalism. (Masland); Time served to 6 months and $300 fine for DUI. (Ebert)
  • Holly Jo Thrush: Time served to 12 months for theft by unlawful taking or disposition. (Masland)

Other

  • Shane Donovan Gebhart: Forty-eight hours to 6 months and $500 fine for DUI, high rate. (Peck)
  • Anthony William Saccente: Two months to 23 months, $500 fine and restitution of $597 for identity theft, credit of 36 days; 1 year of probation for access device fraud. (Peck)
  • Gisela Towle: Ninety days to 5 years and $1,500 fine for DUI, second offense; $25 fine for careless driving. (Masland)

Sentenced to Probation

Boiling Springs

  • Claire Gabrielle Gross: Six months’ probation and $300 fine for DUI. (Masland)

Camp Hill

  • Ryan Stroup: Six months’ probation and $300 fine for DUI. (Peck)

Carlisle

  • Michael Angelo Kaydo Jr.: Twenty-four months’ probation, restitution of $282 and 48 hours of community service for receiving stolen property. (Ebert)
  • Gregory Alan Kurtz: Six months’ probation and $300 fine for DUI, second offense. (Placey)
  • Abdulah Sejmenovic: Six months’ probation and $300 fine for DUI. (Guido)

Duncannon

  • Devin John Crisamore: Nine months’ probation, $50 fine and restitution of $275.57 for retail theft. (Peck)

Enola

  • Connie Lorraine Holt: Twelve months’ probation, $100 fine and 25 hours of community service for recklessly endangering another person. (Masland)

Harrisburg

  • Akbar Kahn Turner: Six months’ probation and $300 fine for DUI. (Placey)

Mechanicsburg

  • Robert J. Demartyn Jr.: Six months’ probation and $300 fine for DUI; $200 fine for reckless driving. (Brewbaker)

New Cumberland

  • Matthew David Miller: Six months’ probation and $300 fine for DUI. (Placey)

Shippensburg

  • Sarsalan Sajjad Jaffry: One year of probation and $25 fine for unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia. (Brewbaker)
  • Joshua Moses Smalls: Twelve months’ probation and restitution of $205.45 for access device fraud. (Masland)

Sentenced to Electronic Monitoring

Camp Hill

  • Manual Ambrocio Garcia: Sentenced to 30 days’ electronic monitoring for driving while under suspension. (Brewbaker)

Enola

  • Daniel Kiner: Sentenced to 60 days’ electronic monitoring for driving while under suspension-DUI-related. (Brewbaker)
  • Chad E. Quigley: Sentenced to 60 days’ electronic monitoring for driving while under suspension-DUI-related. (Brewbaker); Sentenced to 60 days’ electronic monitoring for driving while under suspension-DUI-related. (Brewbaker)

Duncannon

  • Tyler Brant Thorpe: Sentenced to 30 days’ electronic monitoring for driving while under suspension. (Brewbaker)

Harrisburg

  • Omar Magallanes: Sentenced to 30 days’ electronic monitoring for driving while under suspension. (Brewbaker)
  • Dante J. Selby: Sentenced to 30 days’ electronic monitoring for driving while under suspension. (Brewbaker)

Lemoyne

  • Luis Mavungo: Sentenced to 30 days’ electronic monitoring for driving while under suspension. (Brewbaker)
  • Jason Adam Miller Sr.: Sentenced to 6 months’ electronic monitoring for driving while under suspension. (Brewbaker)
  • Jeffrey Palmer: Sentenced to 6 months’ electronic monitoring for driving while under suspension. (Brewbaker)

York Haven

  • Ryan Thomas Malone: Sentenced to 30 days’ electronic monitoring for driving while under suspension. (Brewbaker)

Other

  • Moses F. Goitom: Sentenced to 6 months’ electronic monitoring for driving while under suspension-DUI-related. (Brewbaker)

Sentenced to Fine

Shippensburg

  • Sarsalan Sajjad Jaffry: Sentenced to $50 fine for disorderly conduct. (Brewbaker); Sentenced to $50 for disorderly conduct. (Brewbaker)
  • Edward J. Ice: Sentenced to costs for public drunkenness. (Masland)

Sentenced to Intermediate Punishment

Camp Hill

  • Alex Gregory Nelms: Sentenced to intermediate punishment for 2 years and $500 fine for criminal conspiracy to unlawful delivery, manufacture, possession with intent to deliver a Schedule I controlled substance-Heroin. (Peck)

Govt-and-politics
Adwatch: Key attacks in Pennsylvania's GOP race for governor

HARRISBURG — Television attack ads are flying between Scott Wagner and Paul Mango in Pennsylvania’s Republican primary for governor, with a month until the election where GOP voters will pick a challenger to take on Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf.

Attack ads being aired by Mango and Wagner are playing on TV screens across the state, and it could stay that way until the May 15 primary election.

Wagner and Mango had, until recently, battled over who is the most conservative candidate, but they also have taken shots at each other’s records — or their companies’ records — in the private sector.

Meanwhile, a third Republican candidate, Laura Ellsworth, casts herself as the mature alternative.

An analysis of key claims in TV ads aired by Mango and Wagner:

‘Deadbeat dad’

Mango’s 30-second ad that began airing April 4 used a cartoon figure of Wagner and pounded him as a slumlord, a polluter, a sleazy bail bondsman, a greedy businessman and, perhaps most damning, a deadbeat dad.

In question was the Mango ad’s contention that Wagner was “hauled into court and ordered to pay $800,000 in back alimony and child support.”

The allegation was based on Wagner’s long-running child support and alimony case. It followed the 2008 separation from his third wife and involved support for his youngest daughter, Cristina.

A judge found in 2012 that Wagner had an $800,000 overdue payment in a case stemming from a dispute over Wagner’s income that should be considered eligible for calculating his support obligations. The judge’s opinion noted that Wagner had made support payments going back to the separation.

A lawyer who has 26 years focusing on family law, John F. King, of suburban Harrisburg, said the term “deadbeat dad” is a somewhat subjective term. After looking over the judge’s decision in Wagner’s case, King concluded that Wagner “certainly did not turn his back on wife and child. He just dramatically underpaid (based upon his legal obligation) until ordered by the court to do otherwise,” he wrote in an email.

A deadbeat dad, King said, is often used to describe someone who tries to avoid their support obligation. “Mr. Wagner did not try to avoid his obligation,” King wrote. “He did, however, try to seriously mitigate it.”

The case dragged on for three years because it was a complex case, and required fact-finding, expert analysis and numerous hearings, King said.

Wagner’s campaign said he had paid child support on time and his lawyer in the case told the York Daily Record in 2013 that the sides ultimately settled the case in a confidential agreement.

‘Obamacare advocate’

A 30-second ad that Wagner began airing March 13 made several claims about Mango or the consultancy where he worked for nearly three decades, McKinsey and Company.

One key claim calls Mango “the leading advocate for Obamacare,” the sweeping federal health care law called the Affordable Care Act that former President Barack Obama signed in 2010.

Mango spent most of his time at McKinsey as a health care systems consultant, before leaving the company in early 2017 to run for governor.

In support of the claim, the Wagner campaign cited little more than a 2009 magazine article in which Mango agreed with hospital-system officials that universal insurance with subsidies for the poor would greatly reduce hospital losses and a paper Mango co-authored in 2007 that cited mandated coverage as one of various approaches health systems use to fix problems.

In any case, Wagner’s campaign did not identify a single statement by Mango that urged Congress to pass the legislation or suggested that Mango was a leading advocate.

Jonathan Gruber, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology economist who was a consultant to the Obama administration on technical aspects of the health care law, said he had never heard of Mango.

Also Joan Alker, a prominent health care policy researcher and executive director of the Center for Children and Families at Georgetown University in Washington, said she had never heard of Mango and would not characterize McKinsey as in any way instrumental in the fight for the health care law.

McKinsey, itself, says it is non-partisan and neutral on policy. If anything, McKinsey was noted for a report it produced in 2011 that gave a much harsher assessment than the Obama administration of the law’s effect on private-sector employer-provided insurance.

Mango said he never advocated for the health care law and supports its repeal.


Midstate Briefs

Gun rights

rally held

HARRISBURG—Gun rights rallies were held across the nation, including at the Pennsylvania Capitol.

They come in the wake of several student-led rallies calling on lawmakers to pass tougher gun legislation.

An organization called the National Constitutional Coalition of Patriotic Americans says it held this event to support the second amendment.

Organizers encouraged people to bring their guns to the rally.

Police: Escaped prisoner found dead

EPHRATA—Police said a prisoner died after escaping from custody and running into a 12-foot deep creek handcuffed with a chain restraint belt.

According to a police news release, the prisoner was resisting arrest at 7:47 p.m. Saturday in the parking lot of Wellspan Ephrata Community Hospital.

Ephrata Police were called to the scene to help the Lancaster County Sheriff’s deputy.

By the time officers arrived, the prisoner had escaped custody of the deputy and had run into the Cocalico Creek.

The fire department water rescue team was called to help with the rescue, but the prisoner was found dead at 9:22 p.m.

The Lancaster County District Attorney’s Office, Ephrata Police and Lancaster County Coroner’s Office are investigating.

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