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Carlisle
Downtown Doo Wop concert to benefit Carlisle fire companies, special police
 
 09.14.17

The sounds of doo-wop will bring much needed funding to Carlisle’s first responders.

Downtown DooWop: A Carlisle Saturday Night will be held at 7:30 p.m. Saturday in the Carlisle Theatre. The concert features Bill Haley Jr. and the Comets and the Marcels. Tickets are $25 each, and all seats are reserved.

Tickets may be purchased through Carlisle Theatre and Performing Arts Center at (717) 258-0666 or at www.carlisletheatre.org.

According to their website, Bill Haley Jr. and the Comets “is a high-energy five-piece combo performing a rousing, crowd-pleasing set of songs first recorded at the dawn of rock ‘n’ roll by the legendary Bill Haley and the Comets, and other popular tunes from the 1950s and ‘60s.”

The Marcels are known for their hit “Blue Moon,” and have been recording since 1961.

Proceeds from the concert will be divided among Union Fire Company, Carlisle Fire and Rescue Services and Carlisle Special Fire Police, with the fire companies each receiving 45 percent of the proceeds and the fire police receiving 10 percent.

“It’ll be a fun night in downtown Carlisle and also be helpful to the fire company,” said former mayor Kirk Wilson, who organized the concert.

This will be the third time the Marcels have appeared in town, Wilson said. Previous appearances have drawn audiences of 300-400, but Wilson hopes that 800 or so will pack the Carlisle Theatre for the concert.

Wilson said the idea came about as he and former council member Frank Rankin talked about how the fire department never seems to have enough money. It receives appropriations from local government, but that isn’t much and is supplemented by fundraisers that are an additional draw on the time of volunteers.

Amy Myers, president of Union Fire Company, said the company is well-supported by four municipalities, but that it relies on fundraising to balance the budget. Money from fundraising efforts is used for capital projects such as new apparatus and station improvements as well as activities such as the fire museum and appreciation banquet.

“We don’t feel it’s appropriate to use municipal monies to pay for these items,” she said.

Planning and executing fundraisers take time, and can start 10 months in advance with meetings among the committee as well as with vendors and sponsors, Myers said.

Wilson said he was a member of the fire company from 1968 until 1980 and felt the time pinch that draws more and more volunteers away. Between work schedules and new training requirements, it was impossible for him to continue.

“I know what it means and I know we have fewer and fewer people who are willing to do it,” Wilson said.

Myers said the fire company is required to obtain a certain level of training and certification that takes nearly 250 hours to complete. It holds monthly company training night as well as a joint monthly training with Carlisle Fire and Rescue Services.

“If we don’t train, we won’t execute our primary mission effectively,” she said.

Bob Wertz, captain of the Carlisle Regional Special Police, said their only fundraiser is parking cars for Carlisle Events. At the same time, the organization spends about $4,500 to fully equip each of its volunteers with protective gear, vests, winter coats, cones, lights, gloves, hats and more.

“People don’t realize all the things we purchase for the protection of the fire police when they are out on calls,” Wertz said.

Proceeds from the concert “will be a nice little help,” he said.

“Every dollar helps. Every hour we don’t have to spend on fundraising activities gives us another hour to focus on our primary mission,” Myers said.


Michael Bupp photos, The Sentinel  

Members of Carlisle High School’s Wingin’ It! improv group perform during the United Way of Carlisle & Cumberland County campaign kickoff at Carlisle Evangelical Free Church in South Middleton Township.


Carlisle
Endless possibilities: United Way of Carlisle and Cumberland County kicks off campaign with $1.45 million goal
 
 09.13.17

The United Way of Carlisle and Cumberland County kicked off its 99th annual campaign Wednesday with a breakfast at Carlisle Evangelical Free Church.

The goal for this year’s campaign is $1.45 million to support the greater Carlisle community.

Campaign co-chairs Tom Bream of S&T Bank and Greg Hall of Smith Elliott Kearns & Co. hosted the breakfast at which they recognized pacesetter companies that have already conducted their internal campaigns to give the overall campaign a boost at its start.

Those campaigns have raised $255,628, which puts the United Way at 18 percent of its goal. When early campaign pledges are added in, the total funds raised at the campaign’s start amount to $354,958.

The audience listens as Samantha Krepps, manager of public and community relations for Giant, speaks during the United Way of Carlisle & Cumberland County campaign kickoff at Carlisle Evangelical Free Church in South Middleton Township.

Samantha Krepps, manager of public and community relations for Giant, the breakfast’s sponsor, asked the audience to imagine going without coffee, and to take that a step further to imagine going without breakfast, lunch and dinner.

“Imagine if this continued for a few days. It would take a definite toll on your well-being,” she said.

Then, she asked the gathering to imagine a community in which every child has breakfast, goes to school with energy to learn, and graduating from school and college to repeat the cycle with his own children.

“If you can imagine, the possibilities are endless,” she said.

Krepps encouraged donors to donate what is most comfortable for them, adding that the donations may help a friend, neighbor or even yourself.

The recent hurricanes that devastated Texas, Florida and other areas were also on the minds of the speakers. Krepps pointed to the service organizations, like the United Way, that have been active on the ground in the affected areas.

“They have been able to raise money, collect supplies, round up personnel and volunteers to help clean up those ravaged areas. For those of us who can’t be there, we can donate,” she said.

Pacesetters are recognized during the United Way of Carlisle & Cumberland County campaign kickoff.

The worldwide United Way has set up a website at unitedway.org/recovery through which individuals may make donations. One hundred percent of those donations will go directly to the United Ways in the affected communities.

A panel discussion with leaders from companies that conduct strong employee giving campaigns talked about the importance of connecting to the community, why they invest in the United Way and the greatest concerns facing the community. Panelists were Nora Habig, administrative vice-president of M&T Bank, Ryan Heishman, president of Allen Distribution, and David Steitz, CEO of UMPC Pinnacle Carlisle.

Dave Steitz, chief executive officer at UPMC Pinnacle Carlisle, speaks during the United Way of Carlisle & Cumberland County campaign kickoff at Carlisle Evangelical Free Church in South Middleton Township.

The event also featured a performance — with assistance from the audience — of Carlisle High School’s improv troupe, Wingin’ It. Kate Sainer performed a version of John Lennon’s “Imagine” for which Ron Lang had rewritten the lyrics to fit the United Way and the campaign’s theme.

As his students performed, Wingin’ It adviser Matt Fahnestock thanked the United Way partner agencies that work with children.

Michael Bupp photos, The Sentinel  

Members of Carlisle High School’s Wingin’ It! improv group perform during the United Way of Carlisle & Cumberland County campaign kickoff at Carlisle Evangelical Free Church in South Middleton Township.

“It’s incredible how well prepared these kids come to us in a number of ways,” he said.


The audience listens as Samantha Krepps, manager of public and community relations for Giant, speaks during the United Way of Carlisle & Cumberland County campaign kickoff at Carlisle Evangelical Free Church in South Middleton Township.


Carlisle
Marine Corps League will host annual flag retirement ceremony Saturday
 Joseph Cress  / 
 09.13.17

The public is invited Saturday to a flag retirement ceremony at the Army Heritage and Education Center starting at 9:30 a.m.

The Lewis B. Puller Jr. Marine Corps League Detachment 524 will conduct its 10th annual ceremony where it will properly dispose of hundreds of old, faded, worn-out and beyond-repair flags.

The U.S. Flag Code states, “The flag, when it is in such condition that it is no longer a fitting emblem for display, should be destroyed in a dignified way, preferably by burning.”

The Flag Code was adopted on June 14, 1923 — now known as Flag Day — by the National Flag Conference that was attended by U.S. Army and U.S. Navy representatives and other national groups, according to U.S.Flag.org.

It’s disrespectful to the flag to just throw it out with the garbage, said Jim Grove, a former Marine and member of Detachment 524. Local residents can contact Grove at 243-3788 to arrange for the pick-up of unserviceable flags by Marine Corps League members.

There are also boxes at two locations to drop off unserviceable flags prior to the Sept. 16 ceremony: VFW Post 477, 2104 W. Trindle Road and Carlisle Amvets Post 274, 1580 Ritner Highway.

The public is welcome to bring any unserviceable flags with them to the ceremony, which will include the singing of the National Anthem, the Pledge of Allegiance and comments by Carlisle Police Chief Taro D. Landis, who is a veteran of the Marine Corps and the U.S. Army.

The ceremony will conclude with the firing of a rifle salute and the playing of taps by the Cumberland County Honor Guard.


Ask_answer
Ask/Answered: Aldi temporary closing and ordering new phone books
 Joshua Vaughn  / 
 09.13.17

Asked/Answered is a weekly feature for reader-submitted questions. Follow the blog online at www.cumberlink.com:

What is going on with Aldi store in South Middleton Township?

On Aug. 28, the Aldi grocery store in the 200 block of West Minster Drive in South Middleton Township closed.

The move, however, is only temporary.

The store is being remodeled and will have a grand reopening on Sept. 29, according to the store’s website.

In February, Aldi announced it would spend roughly $1.6 billion to remodel stores across the United States, according to the trade publication Supermarket News.

The remodels are aimed at creating more space for meat, dairy, produce and bakery departments while also refreshing the look and adding more natural light, Supermarket News reported.

The store in South Middleton Township is one of three in Cumberland County.

Stores in the 3400 block of Simpson Ferry Road in Camp Hill and the Shippensburg Shopping Center in Shippensburg are open for business.

When are CenturyLink phone books being delivered and what do I do if I did not get one?

The CenturyLink phone books have already been delivered to Cumberland County residents.

The directories were delivered in June, according to CenturyLink spokeswoman Deborah Keyser.

Anyone interested in receiving a phone book but who did not get one in June, or anyone interested in an additional copy, can order one by visiting dexpages.com.

The website includes a complete digital version of the directory and information on how to order a physical copy.

Customers can also call 1-877-243-8339.

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Clark, Lawrence Strausser, Donna